A 501(c)3 supporting the most successful reforestation project in Haiti

What is CODEP?

Since 1990, CODEP, a rural community intent upon reclaiming their land and their future has been working with Haiti Reforestation Partnership (previously known as Haiti Fund, Inc.)

The Story of CODEP

CODEP ‘COmprehensive DEvelopment Program’ is a loose community of rural neighborhoods (lakous) that have invested themselves in reforesting the mountains around their homes. Beginning with only 40 people in the early 1990’s, it grew to about 550 people in 30 lakous and then more than doubled in recent years as everyone could see the results. Whole swaths of mountainsides are now covered with trees – 14 MILLION so far.

Forests make all the difference. The soil is richer, the rain sinks in and when water emerges in streams, it is clear. Fishponds thrive, gardens can grow, and fruit trees are provided protection from the harshest sunlight.

Thus, people have more to eat, have produce to sell, and can send children to school rather than lose them to urban slums of Port au Prince.

Are you curious on how you can get involved?

Above Léogâne and along the Jacmel Road, CODEP now impacts six watersheds.

During Hurricane Matthew, the Cormier River did not crest nor wash out the bridge, a testament to the CODEP forests above that held the soil.

We Plant Trees and Good Things Happen

A view of various stages of tree growth looking into the demonstration forest
  • Pepinyes: Small plastic bags are filled with a soil mixture and one seed each and then allowed to grow to seedling size in a protected area.
  • 0 to 1 year: The seedlings are planted in the trenches and receive moisture from rain and the absorbent compost.
  • 1+ to 5 years: The saplings grow quickly as its own leaves create further compost and nutrients. The temptation is for people to harvest them for charcoal but CODEP incentivizes people to plant and protect the young trees.
  • 5+ to 7 years: At this point the tree is too big to cut down and carry off. It survives and thrives amidst a grove that is anchoring the soil and retaining water.
  • 7+ to 25 years: The forest grows. The increasing leaf cover allows for additional agriculture and fish ponds. And, the birds return!

We Plant Trees and Good Things Happen

Gardens & Orchards

Gardens & Orchards

With restored soil and better water retention, CODEP folks plant gardens of vegetables and orchards of fruit and melletons and avocados.

Fish Ponds

Fish Ponds

An important source of protein comes from fish which are grown and harvested from CODEP built fish ponds.

Water

Water

The magic is the water. It is clear in the streams and the rain is absorbed by the soil. The run-off in storms is curbed. Clean drinking water is available.

Housing

Housing

Housing: CODEP helped repair and build new homes after the 2010 earthquake. Housing is part of the incentive scheme for CODEP participants.

Schools

Schools

CODEP has established a school that is already bursting at the seams and provides a high quality education. It was built by one of CODEP’s partners, Building Goodness Foundation in 2013.

Livelihoods

Livelihoods

CODEP participants can sell their extra produce for some income. Mak CODEP is the brand of the produce raised in the areas and sold at the new Depot (headquarters).

Environmental Impact

Environmental Impact

During Hurricane Matthew the value of CODEP forests was noticeable as the Cormier River below CODEP were less silted and did not wash out its bridge. In the more mature forest you can sit and hear birds that have come back to areas that once were denuded of vegetation.

The Story of CODEP Continues

In 2015, the Haitian government recognized CODEP in its own right. This was a huge step for the project which had proven itself as committed agro-foresters but can now legally take the reins of leadership, decision-making, and more.

Even more importantly, CODEP is emerging as the chief example of reforestation success in Haiti and hopes to share and apply its methods, seedlings, know-how, self-governance, and more to the benefit of other communities. The immediate sights are set on continuing to reforest the land along the Jacmel Road – up and over the mountains to the sea on the other side.  

Will you help the story continue?

Yes

CODEP Leadership

CODEP’s leadership is a group of 15 “Animators,”
the legal custodians who set direction, and patiently nurture the smaller working groups out on the mountainsides changing the face of Haiti.

CODEP Leadership

Rene, Clement, and Edvy jointly serve on the CODEP board and facilitate the decisions of the Animators. John Winings serves as a Senior Advisor to them.

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What does Haiti Reforestation Partnership do?